Meghan Trainor nicely summed up 2015: it was all about the bass, no treble. The (annoying) hit song is about having a big derriere, but considering the fact that it played everywhere 24/7, I’m sure you already knew that - unless you have been living under a rock or some sort of isolated monastery this past year and missed all of this. In which case I have to say I envy you.

But enough about the bass, that’s so cliché now. There’s a fresh body part to obsess over because *drumroll* arms are the new booty. To be honest, this trend is so hot that it has barely hit the press, but in the spirit of Nostradamus, I predict that it will be maybe as common as the nose job in a few years. (Nostradamus himself would never use the word ‘maybe’ but I don’t want to sound like a pompous-know-it-all).



While the procedure is catching on, it’s a difficult surgery to recognize in those who have had it since most of the time your arms are covered up. I first encountered it when an insider—who has done the surgery herself—confessed that this is one of the most pursued but least talked about surgeries.

According to her, the arm lift, or more accurately, brachioplasty, is now the newest thing among some image-obsessed thirty-somethings. Traditionally it has been the exclusive domain of those with excessive sagging skin—often accompanied by dramatic and sudden weight loss. But it seems that these days people are opting for the procedure in a bid to obtain a super skinny look.



[Before and after]

Recently, a friend of a friend (who asked to remain anonymous) had the procedure done in Los Angeles. She said that everyone noticed that an improvement in her look though nobody could pinpoint exactly what it was. “Some people thought I had breast augmentation and I would swear to them that I didn’t—I guess it just looked bigger in comparison with my arms,” she laughs.

But it’s not all fun and games. Like any major surgery, there are many risks you have to consider before dreaming of an arm lift. Bleeding, inflection, permanent scarring, and even persistent pain are all possible side-effects, and most people will have a scar as a souvenir from the surgery.

The surgery will also set you back around $4,000 dollars, so it’s not a decision to take lightly.

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